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launched by the u.s. and other countries. president obama again making the case for why the u.s. went in, but how does it end? >>> in japan, the disaster deepens with new problems at the nuclear plant. there are new fears about food safety and an american family has received the worst possible news about their daughter. our teams are on the ground. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. in addition to two wars on two other fronts, the united states military tonight is engaged against libya. the attacks are in the form of air strikes. 32 of them in just the last 24 hours. about half now being carried out by u.s. aircraft. and there have been 136 cruise missiles launched. only eight of them by british armed forces. the rest launched by the u.s. they have hit targets up and down the libyan coastline, mostly aimed at libyan defenses, so the coalition aircraft can begin enforcing that no-fly zone over a larger portion of the country. the united states says moammar gadhafi is not a target personally, but president obama says the u.s. acted in
ababab >>> making news this tuesday ll the u.s. lead the quest to crush gadhafi's forces? >>> severe spring weather. one of california's biggest rainmakers ever. spawning blizzards and tornadoes across the country. >>> and dancing debut. kirstie alley, even the karate kid, begin their quest for the mirrorball trophy. >>> good morning. the no-fly zone in libya appears easier to enforce this morning after another round of military might. >> here, now, are the latest developments from libya. u.s.-led air strikes lit up the skies over tripoli for a third night. >> but the american military commanders are looking to hand over control of this operation as soon as possible. >> president obama says, while moammar gadhafi needs to go, the libyan leader is not the target of the air strikes. emily schmidt begins our coverage this morning in washington. good morning, emily. >> reporter: rob and peggy, good morning to you. moammar gadhafi has kept an uncharacteristically low profile the past couple of days. no signs of him amidst all the signs of an expanding no-fly
was trying to help low- income immigrants adjust to life in the u.s. new life after amnesty, a lot of people were not able to immigrate because of a lack of money. still to this point, i see a lot of immigrants who want to get their work permits. i ask them how long they have been here. sometimes they have been here since the 1970's, 1980's, 1990's. a lot of them are elderly who are ready to retire. i had 165-year-old man who is alone, no family -- a 65-year- old man who is alone, no family here, but he does not have any papers to get that social security that he has contributed to for 30 years. he will be homeless after working for many years. i faced this situation with my clients a lot. i help low income people. sometimes it is very difficult. sometimes i think about how small the world is a and i see how immigration laws are changing. immigration rates started about 40 years ago and i started to see my client to come to me. my husband has been here 10 years and all of a sudden, his employer is asking for a work permit. we have two children. we just bought a home. what are we going to do?
international airport. the shooting involved a u.s. military shuttle bus. someone got on the bus and started shooting. two are confirmed dead. we believe they're two u.s. soldiers. one person has been taken into custody. again we know two are killed. it is reported that those are two u.s. soldiers. the incident is over, the airport is operating as usual. this is out of frankfurt. as soon as we get more detail, we get to fred out of berlin. >>> the u.s. supreme court is reaffirming the first amendment right to free speech even if it is painful and ugly. in an 8-1 decision, they say a kansas church can push their message outside military funle rals. jeffrey toobin is on the phone with us. jeff, let's start off here, is this a surprise to you the court's decision? because this is a case that everybody's been watching. >> reporter: it's a pain until awful case and the westboro baptist church is an insuggelt religion everywhere. but the decision is not a surprise. these statements in this context, nondisruptive statements about politics, are at the heart of what the first amendment is all about e
to make the case for u.s. involvement,. this comes as libyan rebels resume their offensive. they advanced 350 miles this weekend and retook two key oil towns. military missions are mostly completed according to u.s. officials. >> we prevented the large-scale slaughter that was beginning to take place and has taken place in some places. >> on one hand they say it's humanitarian and on the other they say gaddafi must go. >> defense secretary gates and secretary of state clinton will be brief congress on the u.s. mission in libya and the cost. the president will speak tonight at 7:00 -- 7:30 on abc 7 news. >>> monday. the crisis at the crippled nuclear power plant may be getting worse. japanese officials say highly radioactive iodine is seeping from the facility. contaminated sea water is being found farther from the plant. they are pumping hundreds of tons of radioactive water. now the plant operators are apologizing for overstating radio -- radiation levels inside the reactors. >>> 32 years ago today the u.s. suffered its worst nuclear crisis, three mile island nuclear plant in pennsylvani
are without food, clean water and electricity. we have team coverage from the epicenter of thedy sast to the u.s. greg, what is the latest? >> a cold dark night here in the fishing village and the folks probably went to bed thinking of what the prime minister had to say. he told them it would take determination to get them through this. just up the coast, the nuclear complex with so much problems in the past couple of days, today, another reactor facing the possibility of a meltdown. they say they are in control of the situation. but the evacuation from the region around the reactors continues and the possibility of poisoning from radioactivity also going forward. dozens are testing positive for that. now to the number. there is one official here, in one region who said yesterday that 10,000 people were missing. now he is saying he feels that 10,000 people are dead in his region alone. that may add to the figure. we traveled today and we notice shortages are a problem. of food, of fuel and power in this village, of everything people need to get by. that is why relief is rushing to this area. tod
>>> good morning, attack on libya. u.s. and allied forces strike libya with cruise missiles >>> good morning. attack on libya. u.s. and allied forces strike libya with cruise missiles and fighter jets and a show of force against gadhafi. now american stealth bombers have enter the fight. >> we cannot stand idly by when a tyrant tells his people there will be no mercy. >> defiance. the libyan dictator digs in, calling the coalition operation terrorism and warning it could ignite a crusader war. >>> and miracle rescue. nine days after the earthquake that devastated japan, two survivors are saved from the rubble. today is sunday march 20th, 2011. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good morning, everyone. welcome to "today" on a sunday. >>> good morning, everyone. welcome to "today" on a sunday. i'm lester holt. >> i'm jenna wolf. breaking news out of libya today where the assault on gadhafi intensifies. >> this morning a senior pentagon official says three american b-2 stealth bombers have been used dropping bottoms in a libyan airfield. american pilots are takin
after soaring radiation forces a retreat. and the u.s. tells americans to evacuate a 50-mile danger zone. i'm katie couric. also tonight, the question everyone in this country is asking: could it happen here? the u.s. has 23 nuclear reactors just like those in japan. how safe are they and we? and as the search goes on for victims of the earthquake and tsunami, an american exchange teacher is among the missing. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. they have what could be the most dangerous job in the world, and the world is rooting for them to get it done. the nuclear power plant workers in japan trying to prevent a meltdown. radiation at the dai-ichi plant in fukushima got so high today they were forced to leave temporarily, but now they're back on the job. japan has raised the maximum radiation dose allowed for nuclear workers so they can deal with the crisis, but the head of the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission told congress today the doses those workers could be
japan crews are trying to prevent a nuclear melt down. u.s. officials are trying to calm the nerves of americas who fear radiation can reach the west coast. >> we don't expect it to reach the west coast. >> we have the latest developments from the nuclear power plant, plus how one government age agency is beefing up radiation detection. >> crews are working around the clock at the fukushima dai-ichi nuclear power plant. the crews are working to reconnect electricity to the cooling system to cool the rods. other crews are spraying and dumping water on the nuclear few. smoke can be seen from building number 2 right now. the cause is not known but a explosion hit the building on tuesday. it is possible the cooling chamber is damaged. low levels of radiation have been detected beyond tokyo, which is 140 miles south of the nuclear power plant. u.s. is warning americans to leave the country and the government is offering voluntary evacuations. today president obama spoke about the situation in japan. this is video of president obama visiting the japanese embassy. the president wrote a mes
and balanced. >> bret: a massive earthquake strikes japan. how is the u.s. responding? now there are concerns about nuclear power plants there. president obama says the noose is tightening around muammar gaddafi but events may suggest otherwise. saudi day of rage, did it materialize? live from the studio in washington. this is "special report." good evening. i'm bret baier. the u.s. and the rest of the world are mobilizing tonight to assist japan, following a massive earthquake and tsunami early this morning. the magnitude 8.9 offshore quake unleashed a 23-foot tsunami. hundreds are believed dead and that number could rise. japan says the power inside the nuclear plant is 1,000 times than the normal level. they lost control over pressure in reactors. waves hit hawaii and the u.s. west coast causing major damage to boats in one california harbor and one person is reported missing. japan's eastern coast saw massive devastation in an instant the office buildings became danger zones. >> i thought i was going to die. >> bret: the magnitude 8.9 offshore quake shook cities and villages up and down j
. this morning, target libya. u.s. and european forces pound libya overnight. taking out key targets at the u.s. gets embroiled in a new overseas conflict. now moammar gadhafi is surrounding key sites with women and children to create a human shield. how involved will the u.s. get? >>> hope and fear. nine days after the tsunami, an incredible rescue. an 80-year-old woman and a teenage boy found alive. but then, there's this. the drinking water in tokyo, now tainted with radiation. >>> fall from grace. he was the most famous bear in the world. knut the polar bear has died at the young age of 4. how did he go from the top of the world to this tragic end? >>> and bullied no more. this is the video giving hope to underdogs all over the world. this boy body-slams his bully. this morning, he's telling his story. what made him snap? >>> good morning. the u.s. is now involved in its third overseas conflict. this one is called operation odyssey dawn. and throughout the night, we saw images like these. u.s. and british ships and submarines launches missiles at libyan targets to establish a no-fly zone ov
. police are searching for possible accomplices. >>> in business news the federal reserve says the u.s. economy continues toex pand gradually while some manufacturers and retailers are starting to pass on higher crude oil prices to customers. >>> on wednesday the fed released the so-called beige book report. that's a survey of economic conditions in the 12 districts across the country. the document says overall economic activity continued to expand at a modest to moderate pace in january and early february. it says most districts reported continued rises in corporate production and con sumtder spending. meanwhile, the report notes that manufacturers and retailers have passed on higher costs of crude oil and raw materials to clients and or are planning to do so in the near future. this trend will likely continue if commodity prices keep rising. >>> now, apple chief executive steve jobs returned from medical leave for a day to unveil a new lighter ipad tablet computer equipped with two cameras. >> thanks for coming. thank you. it's really thin. and it comes in two colors. >> jobs made hi
. officials have been scrambling to avoid a meltdown ever since and are now asking the u.s. for help. >> in particular they have asked for additional types of equipment that will help provide water and other types of resources to ensure that the reactors continue to be cooled. >> reporter: fears of a full blown meltdown have spread all the way to tokyo located 150 miles from the plant. officials there have detected low levels of radiation and a shift in winds threatens to push it even further. even without a possible nuclear disaster, japan is facing its worst crisis since world war ii. death toll jumped to more than 2400 confirmed dead, but officials warn that number is likely to top 10,000. and now the country faces an economic crisis, as well. this morning japanese stocks plummeted more than 10%. as far as that radiation cloud, as i said, they have picked up low levels of radiation outside of tokyo, but there is another concern whether it intensifies and the wind shifts, it could head toward that area that was hardest hit by the earthquake and tsunami that followed. >> as we hear
indoors. the u.s. government says its residents within 50 miles should leave. >> we think it's a prudent measure to follow the evacuation based on how we would handle a situation like that in the united states. >> reporter: there are six reactors at the site. in unit 1 an explosion destroyed part of an outer building. in unit 2 there may have been an explosion rupturing the containment facility and possibly letting radioactive fuel escape. unit 3 was the target of today's water drops. it too had an explosion of the outer building and it also has exposed fuel rods. unit 4 was shut down for maintenance when the earthquake struck, but it became the subject of a controversy when the head of the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission said its stored fuel rods were totally exposed. units 5 and 6, which are also out of service, may also have problems with their used fuel rods. experts say unit 3 is especially dangerous, because it has recycled fuel that contains plutonium, an even greater health threat than the uranium in the oar reactors. the first of that electricity, brian, will go to unit 2. un
, this time at reactor number 4. martha: the u.s. officials say the next 28-48 hours are critical in stopping and cooling down what's going on inside these reactors. if it doesn't happen, this area could be deadly for many years to come. good morning julian. tell me what the latest is from where you are. >> reporter: i think have much the efforts today to put cold water on the reactors has failed. the helicopters have only marginally put as much water as they wanted to on the reactors. it doesn't seem to be having a regular effect. all hopes rest with the crews trying to link up the electricity line back into the plant that will then allow them to restart the generators which automatically pump cold water onto these heated up reactors and bring temperatures down. all other efforts seem to have failed. the attempt to use fire engines to pump cold water on the reactors has failed. they are look at a single solution now. martha: it sounds like it's up to these people known as the fukushima 50, 180 workers rotating in and out of the plant to limit their own exposure to the radiation. what a coura
coast, hawaii, alaska, or u.s. territories in the pacific. rick: officials in japan are calling it a race against time. we have video for you of water being dropped into the overheating reactors at the fukushima plant. this is something that has not proven successful in the past. japan is raising the severity of the situation from a 4 to a 5. the government is acknowledging that it was overwhelmed and continues to be overwhelmed by the situation. gavin blair is on the phone from japan. i understand you are traveling to sendai, which is one of the areas hardest hit by this catastrophy. >> reporter: we just popped through the u.s. exclusion zone or the japanese he can collusion zone. it has been reclassified up to a 5. the chopper missions to drop water has had minimal effect on cool the plant. they tried hosing the plant with fire engines. but apparently the fire truck hoses couldn't reach the plant. however, having said that, the levels of radiation in tokyo have returned to normal. apparently the italian embassy found that levels of radiation were a fifth of what they were in r
. this is overnight videotape from the u.s. navy, a u.s. coalition launching two nights of punishing air attacks targeting mommar gadhafi's forces, b52 bombers, jet fighters, more than 120 tom hawk cruise missiles, scattering progovernment forces on the ground in libya, the long time leader vowing a long war ahead. good morning, everybody. we've got it all covered for you. what a way to start a weefnlgt i'm bill hemmer, welcome to "america's newsroom". good morning to you martha. martha: good morning, bill. i am martha maccallum. an international air assault, all but crippling libya's air defenses, that according to the u.s. military. listen to this: >> there has been no new air activity by the regime and we have de tented no radar emissions from the defense sites targeted and there has been a significant decrease in the use of all libyan air surveillance radar which is most of those appear to be limited now only to the areas around tripoli and surt. we are not ruling out strikes against valid targets when and if the need arises. martha: there you have it, u.s., british and french planes blastin
snowing in the disaster areas. >> u.s. officials closely monitoring this crisis say focus is on reactors three and four, where spent fuel rods under great danger of releasing plumes of radioactivity. >> there is no end to the nuclear crisis at the fukishima plant. the focus is reactors three and four, where old, spent fuel rods are releasing plumes of radioactivity. >> hollywood likes to focus on the melt down, melted core, exposed uranium. old fuel is more dangerous because there is more radiation in unguarded pond. >> the mission to cool reactors with helicopters dumping buckets of water failed. the japanese plan is to restart with a new power line, officials fear those may not work if energy is restored which is why the u.s. is sending a high pressure pump. >> all u.s. citizens in japan should continue to monitor situations and follow guidance of the u.s. and japanese governments. >> inside of the plant 180 workers at great right after this tok their lives are being reroe tated in and out of the danger zone. outside thousands are being evacuated. >> the government told us we're safe,
plants right here in the united states. >>> and will the u.s. supreme court green light a massive discrimination lawsuit against walmart? arguments today in one of the most important workers' rights cases the court has ever heard. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> moammar gadhafi and his troops are being accused of new carnage and destruction. just hours after president obama tried to explain the u.s. mission in libya to the american people. this hour we have breaking news. we're learning about major, major setbacks for rebel forces in several cities. in misrata, witnesses say government forces are hammering the city hard, firing bullets over civilians' heads and telling them to run for their lives. gadhafi is fighting back with a vengeance against rebels who had regained ground in recent days under the cover of coalition air strikes. >>> and joining us now in ajdabiya is our own arwa damon. you're with the rebels there. how are they doing, arwa? what's the latest? >> reporter: well, wolf, it's been another bitterly disappointing day for the opposition here. th
>>> on the broadcast tonight, sending weapons. tonight the prospect of u.s. weapons in the hands of libya's rebel forces. the president says he won't rule it out, so our own richard engel goes inside those rebel forces for a closer look. >>> radiation fears. the nuclear crisis in japan has a lot of people asking could it happen here, and would warning systems work if it did? >>> price check. a new drug to help prevent premature babies, but at what cost for those who need it? >>> and the close call for an american president 30 years ago tonight. what we didn't know until now. >>> also here tonight, the first-ever view of a neighbor of ours. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. right about now during these past few days across our country, people are watching this unfolding situation in libya. the rebels versus gadhafi. americans have heard president obama defending the u.s. air campaign he ordered, sending our service members to fight a third concurrent conflict far from home. in our conversation with the president yesterday, h
to rate disasters that only rated linganore levels. >> the u.s. has already conducted helicopter missions along the battered coastline and found a few isolated communities of survivors. >> wease alan -- we found essentially hundreds of people, 100 at this place, to wonder at this place. it is just a matter of getting them out -- 200 at this place. it is just a matter of getting them out. >> the u.s. carrier ronald reagan is still off the shore of japan launching aircraft loaded with supplies. but the shift moved further on tuesday after some crewmembers tested positive for low levels of radiation. -- further out to sea after some crewmembers tested for low levels of radiation european pet energy officials are applying stress tests to their plant and germany officials have switched off some of their plants, one of them permanently. >> the nuclear crisis in japan comes just as america had finally started to get past its discomfort with nuclear power, caused more than 30 years ago by three mile island. >> it is called the nuclear present -- renaissance, the growing acceptance in recent years
, and the u.s. are scrambling to enforce a no-fly zone over libya now that the u.n. security council has authorized all necessary measures. cnn international correspondent nic robertson is live in tripoli. good morning, nic. >> reporter: good morning, christine. well, we've already heard from the deputy foreign minister here who says he doesn't expect immediate air strikes here, but wouldn't say what preparations the army or anyone else in the country may be taking to defend the country with this new u.n. resolution. when he was asked about the cease-fire that the resolution calls for, he seemed to indicate that the government here was going to take some time to do that. they didn't have anyone to negotiate with that they would put it in place. but this was something that was going to take time. seemed to hint that the army here may plan to continue with some of its offensive. that offensive was going on in the east, and we have no updated information from that front line this morning, christine. >> does this u.n. resolution paint -- does it paint them into a corner, gadhafi and his alli
, tsunami warnings for at least 20 countries. and hawaii and the west coast of the u.s. under warnings as well. let me tell you about this quake. a devastating one, one of the most powerful earthquakes ever recorded. it was an 8.9 magnitude quake. it hit off the coast of japan overnight. there have been several powerful aftershocks being felt, up to 7.0 in magnitude. the quake was centered 300 miles from tokyo, but it was felt in tokyo. buildings swayed. take a look at these pictures. our bureau there in tokyo as well. some of our co-workers being thrown around at times as well. this is just one of the views inside. people poured out onto the streets afterwards. they say it's a city in chaos right now. the danger we have now, the concern, a tsunami. it did trigger a tsunami, massive waves, some as high as 30 feet, starting to come ashore in places. this wall of water is starting to bring with it -- it's washing away cars, boats, buildings. looks like lava almost making its way through. here's the most stunning picture. waves of mud and debris can be seen like lava flowing through some
>>> breaking news this thursday morning. >> getting out. overnight, the u.s. government announces plans to airlift americans from danger. >> it's because of the critical situation at the devastated nuclear plant. workers on a race against time before radiation spreads. but one expert tells abc news, it's almost too late. >>> and good morning, everyone. i'm mike marusarz, in for rob nelson. >> and i'm peggy bunker. despite little radiation risk in most of japan, this morning, there's a race to leave the country. >> for the first time, the u.s. has authorized the evacuation of family members of american diplomats. charter planes are being used to fly americans away from danger. >> and the u.s. is pressuring japan to step up its efforts to avert a nuclear meltdown. they dropped sea water on the crippled reactors today. a heroic step, since the pilots are risking their lives to complete that mission. >> and the tokyo stock market, dropping once again. >>> it was a night of high-level phone calls over the nuclear crisis, as president obama spoke to the japanese prime minister. >> while
room." >>> now, breaking news. urgent new teams to cool down an overheated reactor. now the u.s. government is stepping in to evacuate possibly thousands of americans from the country and get them away from any nuclear danger. secretary of state hillary clinton tells our wolf blitzer she's worried about the health and saved of americans in japan even as she heads home from tunis tunisia. i'm candy crowley, you're in "the situation room." nuclear experts say the new attempt to douse an overheated reactor has been somewhat effective. helicopters, fire trucks and police water cannons all have been deployed. we are told that radiation levels dipped, but they are still high, so the frarchtic work to prevent a full-scale meltdown goes on. cnn's anna coren is nil tokyo. just bring us up to date. >> well, candidate, it's entering the seventh day of this crisis, and now at the fukushima daiichi plant trying to bring this situation under control. we saw the pictures of the helicopters, trying to spray water onto the reactors. those crews had to get out because of the radiation levels incr
leader's compound overnight. u.s. firepower on display. but for how much longer? >>> radiation risk. spreading now to food and water. but at the devastated plant, some improvements to report today. >>> and the megamerger, set to affect millions of cell phone users. what would an at&t takeover of t-mobile mean for your monthly bill? >>> and good morning, everyone. thanks for being with us today. the u.s.-led coalition is not quite ready to say mission accomplished this morning, even after a weekend of pounding attacks that virtually crippled libya's defenses. >> allied leaders insist gadhafi is not the target of the assault. but a cruise missile did plow into a buildening on his residential compound. >> after that all, what is next? emily schmidt joins us with the latest. good morning, emily. >> reporter: good morning to you. u.s. war planes led most of the assault on libya over the weekend, including 90 tons of bombs dropped by b-2 bombers that were flown in from missouri. but the pentagon says it expects to hand over control of the operation to allies in a matter of days. libya's m
for the u.s. relief effort underway. this is the 3rd marine brigade leaving the marine core station in okinawa, headed to coordinate with the rest of the u.s. forces. and here is the coordination taking place and helicopters from the u.s.s. ronald reagan have done 20 missions to and from japanese ships and food and supplies to three different towns and that's a lot the u.s.s. ronald reagan arrived yesterday and will continue to help out with search and rescue in the area for the days to come. back to you guys. >> alisyn: peter doocy, thank you so much. even for the people who survived this horrible event, the tsunami, they're far from out of the woods. there are roeports that 1.4 million households have been without water since the quake struck and 2 1/2 million households are without lek trysts. >> clayton: the numbers keep going up. earlier in the show, 200,000 people evacuated according to nhk, the public broadcasting company there in japan. 380,000 people have been evacuated to emergency, emergency shelters and many of those shelters, alisyn, as you were pointing out. don't have
. president obama said the u.s. and the world must be ready to act rapidly if the crisis in libya deteriorates. and he didn't rule out the use of a no-fly zone over the country. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight: we get the latest on the fierce fighting in the oil city of brega and the exodus of refugees fleeing the violence. >> woodruff: plus, we talk to libya's ambassador to the united states, ali suleiman aujali who denounced moammar qaddafi last week. >> brown: then, as states battle public sector unions, we have a newsmaker interview with afl-cio chief, richard trumka. >> woodruff: spencer michels reports on the outcry over hikes in insurance premiums in california. >> the new higher health insurance rates for individuals have sparked protests and calls for the government to step in. >> brown: and hari sreenivasan examines mexico's deadly drug wars, as president felipe calderon visits the white house. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> you can't manufacture pride, but pride builds grea
along the country's northeastern coast. american military officials confirm that more u.s. service members were exposed to radiation today and treated with iodine. but because of the wind direction, several navy ships moved closer to the coast after initial pullback of radiation concerns two major aftershocks rattled japan today, causing buildings to sway in tokyo. food, water and heat shortages continue. correspondent adam housley has the latest. >> they is survived the fifth largest earthquake in history and tsunami that devoured everything in its path. now hundreds of thousands of survivors face nuclear exposure and health dangers that may not show for years. >> 11,000 micro-sievert is equivalent of the exposure you get a year if you live a normal life. if you stay in the place for one hour you may be exposed to 11,000. we have to watch this. >> radiation is leaking from two nuclear reactors along the pacific coast heavily damaged by the earthquake. on tuesday, another explosion shook the region, damaging a containment pool and exposing part or all of the nuclear fuel rods insid
to the airport there. he is going to join us for the very latest. again two u.s. service members among those who were killed and injured in an attack there at the airport in germany. we will bring that to you in just a short time. also we want to bring you up to date on fast moving developments. the libyan military has dropped three bombs and you see it on the map, brega. the opposition may control the town managing to drive out libyan troops. that's not the only place to see military action there. military camps on the outskirts. first we want to tell you about an aerial bombing has led some to propose the united states consider imposing a no-fly zone over the country. but the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff said he called this a complex operation. one of those is a uss -- you are looking here at a photo of the ship from today as it went through the canal. near the region. secretary of defense, robert gates has said the repositioning is to provide humanitarian relief and the capen't for emergency evaguations. let me tell you about the capabilities. it has the ability to transport troops,
to do with china and are essential to get right to make sure the u.s. and european countries are on track. >> host: it's almost as if there's a couple of different books in one book. there is your story of the decline of the west, your story of the rise of the east and the lines are going to cross. >> guest: i think this is you can argue there's an absolute part for short talking about the west and its isolation and issues going out there and going in an amazing time and other european economies have done the unthinkable moving hundreds of millions of people out of poverty so this is going to naturally be able to question as well. >> host: let's talk about what is going wrong in the west. >> guest: first of all its important that in terms of the context of my work i talk about the unintended consequences, things that sound like a good intentions but actually yield bad outcomes and what i have done is to focus on the three key ingredients economists focus on as the drivers of economic growth and there is a capital that is basically money, labor that is the work force and then
leading the air assault on libyan air defense and assets on the ground, the u.s. will pull back and hand over command and control to someone. when? >> we anticipate this transition to take place in a matter of days and not a matter of weeks. >> reporter: the u.s. role will then shift to providing logistical support while the uk, france, italy and other countries enforce the no-fly zone. but no one will say how long that will last. >> i wouldn't speculate in terms of length at this particular point in time. >> reporter: after all, the no-fly zone over iraq ended from the end of gulf war i to the beginning of gulf war ii, 11 years. >>> there is now growing international disagreement over the u.s.-led attacks. norway with drew its planes because it was unsure about which country was in charge. meanwhile, russian prime minister vladimir putin railed against the air strikes as outside meddling, saying it is, quote, reminiscent of a medieval call for a crusade when someone called on others to go and liberate something. >>> and be sure to stay with abc news all day as we continue our c
, however, as you noted, because even amid this crisis, the u.s. has had some contact with libyan officials and that has been critical in terms of helping to get americans and others out of the tripoli safely. so if you were to cut off all of those ties, that could put some of the remaining americans, obviously, in some jeopardy. why would the u.s. then take such a dramatic step and cut off all diplomatic ties? because that was a big deal for colonel gadhafi a few years ago when the george w. bush administration finally said he was no longer a rogue state, that they would recognize him diplomatally because he came forward with his weapons program. if all of a sudden the u.s. cut off all ties, that would he remove even more if there is a shred of legitimacy left for gadhafi and remove it once and for all. that would be the pressure point because that is something he has craved so long is have some legitimacy on the world stage. of course, given what ben is reporting and given what is happening on the ground right now, it's doubtful he has any legitimacy but the u.s. is looking for any lever
:00. >> japanese helicopter pilots dumped sea water on damaged nuclear reactors to try to prevent meltdowns as u.s. experts issue an a.m. now warning. >> good evening i'm julie haener. >> and i'm frank somerville. japanese helicopter pilots are trying to fight the meltdown. sea water is being dumped on to the spent fuel rods in order to reduce the radiation exposure. nuclear reactors need a constant source of cooling water. officials in japan hope the helicopter bucket brigade can keep the reactors from overheating while the plant operators scramble to install a power line and use electricity to restore the reactor's cooling systems. >>> now, less than an hour ago, word came that the united states will start evacuating americans from japan, including private citizens and the families of u.s. personnel. president obama informed japan's prime minister of the plans tonight. the obama administration is chartering aircraft to accommodate americans who want to leave. also today the chairman of the u.s. regulatory commission says radiation near the fukushima plant is extremely high and damage at one reac
to the united states. senior u.s. officials tell cnn that one of gadhafi's closest confidants has been calling the state department every day. we also heard this talk by secretary of state hillary clinton yesterday. though u.s. officials say the intention behind these calls is murky. could be a sign the gadhafi regime is exploring options, looking for a way out or disinformation put forth to make gadhafi not trust the people around him. today secretary of state hillary clinton said gadhafi and his inner circle have some choices to make. >> it will be up to gadhafi and his insiders to determine what their next steps are, but we would certainly encourage that they would make the right decision. and not only institute a cease fire but withdrawal from the cities and the military actions and prepare for a transition that does not include colonel gadhafi. the quickest way for him to end this is to serve the libya people by leaving. >> gadhafi shows no sign he is ready to back down. he and his government insist the air strikes are killing and injuring civilians but they have presented no evidence. th
to the west. >>> training accident. a jet engine explodes and catches fire aboard a u.s. aircraft carrier. >>> and cold case. the fbi can't crack this code. >>> and cold case. the fbi can't crack this code. can you? captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning, everybody. thanks for joining us today, i'm betty nguyen. we begin in libya, where cia operatives have been on the ground gathering intelligence, and making contact with rebel forces. the rebel troops are being pushed back by libyan forces, losing about 100 miles in two days. meanwhile, a key adviser to moammar gadhafi has resigned amid some international intrigue. joel brown is in washington. good morning, joel. bring us up to speed. >> a lot going on, betty. good morning to you. we're learning now the cia's been on the ground in libya for weeks now, in some cases working hand in hand with the rebels. but whether or not to supply weapons to the opposition is a whole other matter that sparks fierce debate here in washington. cia operatives are reportedly on the ground in libya. the intelligence agency sent in small teams earlier this
to see you on this monday. i'm terrell brown in for betty nguyen. the pentagon says the u.s.-led air assault on libya has been very effective, inflicting heavy damage on government forces. the air strikes included over 120 cruise missiles, bt bombers and jet fighters. one of moammar gadhafi's compounds in tripoli was hit. but u.s. officials say gadhafi is not a target. the libyan dictator promises a long, hard war. susan mcginnis is in washington with more. susan, good morning to you. >> hi, good morning, terrell. after a weekend of heavy air strikes on libya, the main issue in washington is, where to go from here. u.s. officials are now planning a more limited role for u.s. forces going forward. u.s. officials are not planning to lead the mission in libya much longer. >> we expected in a matter of days to be able to turn over the primary responsibility to others. >> reporter: following a weekend of missile strikes and air patrols, defense secretary robert gates said the pentagon will soon hand over the reins to either the french and british, or to nato. his comments came as american
news sunday. where was president obama and what a world without u.s. leadership looks like. >> our nuclear power plants have undergone exhaustive study and been declared unsafe for contingencies. we have a responsibility to learn from this event and to draw from the lessons to ensure the safety and security of our people. >> welcome "journal editorial report." that was president obama promising a safety review of all u.s. nuclear plants. as the crisis? squaw pan deepened -- as the crisis in japan deepening, they called for the closure of the indian point power plant outside new york city. and connecticut senator joe lieberman saying we should put the brakes on building any new reactors in the u.s. so could what happened in japan happen here? and does the disaster spell the end for the nuclear power industry in the u.s.? joining the panel this week our columnist and deputy editor. kim, you have been reporting this story all week. what is the u.s. nuclear industry saying about the disaster in japan? >>> there are big differences here, paul, and it shouldn't stop nuclear power. here
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